Teens

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The internet has opened up so many opportunities for birth mothers to reunite with children they have given up for adoption. It is causing some ethical questions for everyone involved. A recent story on the Today show talked about birth moms contacting the children they gave up for adoption, some before they even talked to the adoptive parents.

Social media has opened up a whole new world for adoptive parents and kids. There use to be people who were “middlemen” between adoptees and parents. Now millions of people are on Facebook and Twitter and easier to find than ever.

There are children who have no idea they were adopted and with this new trend, parents who’ve adopted children now have to worry about something else. What do you think? Is there an easy answer to this? Should adoptive parents have some kind of rights regarding birth parents contacting their children?

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The internet has opened up so many opportunities for birth mothers to reunite with children they have given up for adoption. It is causing some ethical questions for everyone involved. A recent story on the Today show talked about birth moms contacting the children they gave up for adoption, some before they even talked to the adoptive parents.

Social media has opened up a whole new world for adoptive parents and kids. There use to be people who were “middlemen” between adoptees and parents. Now millions of people are on Facebook and Twitter and easier to find than ever.

There are children who have no idea they were adopted and with this new trend, parents who’ve adopted children now have to worry about something else. What do you think? Is there an easy answer to this? Should adoptive parents have some kind of rights regarding birth parents contacting their children?

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A new report from Columbia University’s National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) shows that nearly half of all of high school students in the U.S. are using addictive substances, and one in three of them are addicted. Alcohol is the number one substance used by teens. Jim Ramstad, former member of Congress and a CASA board member who chaired the report’s National Advisory Commission stated: “Smoking, drinking and using other drugs while the brain is still developing dramatically hikes the risk of addiction and other devastating consequences.”

  • 72.5 percent of high school students have drunk alcohol
  • 46.3 percent of high school students have smoked cigarettes
  • 36.8 percent have used marijuana
  • 14.8 percent have misused controlled prescription drugs
  • 65.1 percent have used more than one substance;

One of the main reasons they conducted this studies was to see why teens were using these substances and focus on how to stop them from using. The number one factor in a teen’s use or non use of addictive substances is parental involvement. “A significant body of evidence shows that a positive family environment and positive parenting practices related to affection, support, monitoring, rules, discipline and reward are associated with reduced risk of teen substance use.”

Do these numbers surprise you? How do you encourage your kids not to use addictive substances, i.e. cigarettes, alcohol, drugs?

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A new report from Columbia University’s National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) shows that nearly half of all of high school students in the U.S. are using addictive substances, and one in three of them are addicted. Alcohol is the number one substance used by teens. Jim Ramstad, former member of Congress and a CASA board member who chaired the report’s National Advisory Commission stated: “Smoking, drinking and using other drugs while the brain is still developing dramatically hikes the risk of addiction and other devastating consequences.”

  • 72.5 percent of high school students have drunk alcohol
  • 46.3 percent of high school students have smoked cigarettes
  • 36.8 percent have used marijuana
  • 14.8 percent have misused controlled prescription drugs
  • 65.1 percent have used more than one substance;

One of the main reasons they conducted this studies was to see why teens were using these substances and focus on how to stop them from using. The number one factor in a teen’s use or non use of addictive substances is parental involvement. “A significant body of evidence shows that a positive family environment and positive parenting practices related to affection, support, monitoring, rules, discipline and reward are associated with reduced risk of teen substance use.”

Do these numbers surprise you? How do you encourage your kids not to use addictive substances, i.e. cigarettes, alcohol, drugs?

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A girls’ track team ditched traditional running uniforms for skorts and found they did better in their sport. The Dunbar Crimson Tide Girls’ Track team decided to try the new uniform thanks to their coach, Marvin Parker. He said he started to notice that many girls, not just on his team, seemed self-conscious in the traditional track uniforms of short shorts or spandex briefs, called spankies.

He talks about a girl he saw give a false start, intentionally, and leave the track in tears. He saw a few boys making rude comments and pointing at her. Other girls seemed uncomfortable in the spankies. “I started paying attention for the rest of the meet and a lot of the girls were uncomfortable with bending over. I decided that we’ve got to do something different for girls.”

He had Buddy Crutchfield, the owner of Rockville-based LightningFitnessWear, design the special running skorts. They are compression shorts with a mini-skirt over them. The girls are much more confident and have gotten compliments on their uniforms.

“You look good, you run good,” Destiny Phillips, a co-captain, said. “It makes you feel different when you’re out on the track, like no one can come get you.”

Added teammate Manaiza Kelley: “I feel classy in it. I feel like a woman.”

What do you think about the ability that a piece of clothing has to give confidence to these young athletes?

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A girls’ track team ditched traditional running uniforms for skorts and found they did better in their sport. The Dunbar Crimson Tide Girls’ Track team decided to try the new uniform thanks to their coach, Marvin Parker. He said he started to notice that many girls, not just on his team, seemed self-conscious in the traditional track uniforms of short shorts or spandex briefs, called spankies.

He talks about a girl he saw give a false start, intentionally, and leave the track in tears. He saw a few boys making rude comments and pointing at her. Other girls seemed uncomfortable in the spankies. “I started paying attention for the rest of the meet and a lot of the girls were uncomfortable with bending over. I decided that we’ve got to do something different for girls.”

He had Buddy Crutchfield, the owner of Rockville-based LightningFitnessWear, design the special running skorts. They are compression shorts with a mini-skirt over them. The girls are much more confident and have gotten compliments on their uniforms.

“You look good, you run good,” Destiny Phillips, a co-captain, said. “It makes you feel different when you’re out on the track, like no one can come get you.”

Added teammate Manaiza Kelley: “I feel classy in it. I feel like a woman.”

What do you think about the ability that a piece of clothing has to give confidence to these young athletes?